Jump to content
The Official Site of the Anaheim Ducks

JiggyToTheCup

Members
  • Content Count

    2,269
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    7

JiggyToTheCup last won the day on March 10

JiggyToTheCup had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1,007 Excellent

About JiggyToTheCup

  • Rank
    True Ducks Fan

Recent Profile Visitors

2,743 profile views
  1. I'm not understanding why you have to get rid of anyone to sign him. Kesler to LTIR. He'd be a great fit. 65. 70, and pro rated 55 pts the last 3 years.
  2. Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf! Grantzlaf!
  3. LIke all player movement ceased for the season after Gub was traded.
  4. We traded it in the Del Zotto trade with VAN. Did we trade for another 7th?
  5. 6 160 Anaheim Albin Sundsvik C Skelleftea AIK [SweHL]
  6. Losers 21. San Jose Sharks Pick: 31. Ozzy Wiesblatt My ranking: No. 52 (change: +21) Wiesblatt’s a blend of old and new. He can play a hard, engaged style that complements high-end talent and makes him look bigger than he is. But he can also make high-skill plays, he’s not afraid to try things, and his o-zone skill developed aggressively last season. My lower ranking here is driven primarily by the fact that I’m not convinced that o-zone skill will translate up levels against bigger, faster, stronger, smarter defenders. Wiesblatt’s a good prospect and a wonderful kid, but he could end up as more of a role player if he doesn’t develop any one of his skills from B-level to A-level. 22. St. Louis Blues Pick: 26. Jake Neighbours My ranking: No. 51 (change: +25) I like the way Jake Neighbours plays. He can do a little bit of everything. He comes at you in waves in an effort to push pace, attack, and win races. He’s physical off the puck. There’s just a versatility to his game that’s easy to appreciate and convinced many scouts that he didn’t have the top-six or bust that some first rounders often do. I settled a little lower on him than most, though, largely because I worry that his above-average skill across the board may not be enough to slot him in the top of your lineup. He could end up as a fan-favourite third-line contributor. And while that would be a good outcome for a 26th-overall selection, there were higher-skill players available. Several of them. 23. Colorado Avalanche Pick: 25. Justin Barron My ranking: No. 46 (change: +21) Barron, once discussed in the same conversations as Jamie Drysdale, has been through a lot in the last year as he and his team have tried to get a blood clot issue under control. After undergoing a procedure a couple of weeks ago to correct it, he became a bit of a wild card in the draft. The worry is that he’s lost valuable development time, he’s a little on the older side, and he didn’t take the steps that came with some of the early hype about his potential. That kept him further down my board and meant he’s not a player I would have considered in the first round. There are a ton of tools to work with there, though, and the gamble the Avalanche are taking is on the maturity of his defensive game and an offensive game that, surely, they hope can take a step with more consistent reps. Barron’s a big, strong, Hockey Canada darling with four-way mobility for his size and a heady approach to moving the puck. Scouts praise his efficiency. I think there was more talent on the board, though. 24. Buffalo Sabres Pick: 8. Jack Quinn My ranking: No. 15 (change: +7) Though I didn’t love the Senators taking Sanderson at No. 5, Quinn was the first real reach of the draft for me. And that has less to do with Quinn’s ability as a prospect (he’s a multi-faceted individual creator who’s game has detail and who’s frame lends itself to continue growth and potential yet-to-be-scratched level) than it does with who else was available. As good as Quinn is, and as exciting as his late-blooming development curve is, there just isn’t a case, for me, for him as a better prospect than a Perfetti or a Rossi. That Rossi was on Quinn’s team, and clearly the best player on that team, makes the pick a weird one for me. 25. Columbus Blue Jackets Pick: 21. Yegor Chinakhov My ranking: Not ranked (!) I had the Blue Jackets last in my prospect pool rankings in February — despite being quite fond of some of their recent drafting — largely because some of my favourites (Emil Bemstrom and Alexandre Texier) had graduated. Despite a young core in Columbus, though, this draft, a year after trading the bulk of their picks, was a pivotal one for an organization that sorely needs to insulate Liam Foudy and Kirill Marchenko. Then they took Chinakhov, who wasn’t ranked inside my top-100, with the 21st-overall pick, and now here they are again, at the bottom of another one of my lists. Chinakhov is a fine prospect who has made waves in recent weeks with his impressive play in the KHL, where he has looked consistently dangerous for Avangard Omsk. He torched the MHL last season, too. I like his ability to get to the slot and manufacture offence. He’s stronger than he looks. He has experience on both wings. But he’s also an overager who was passed up a year ago, I’m not convinced any of his tools are A-level, and he’s probably more of a complementary creator at the NHL level. That’s not the kind of player I’d be looking to target in the first two rounds. Though they moved back once to add a new pick at 78th overall, the Blue Jackets don’t pick again until 114th overall, and they probably felt he wasn’t going to stick around to either slot. I don’t think that means you have to use a first-round bullet on him though. The Results Below is a look at the entirety of the first-round results versus my ranking, including the plus-minus of each pick relative to my board (blue means the player fell to them by X slots, red means they reached on the player by Y slots), colour coding for the wins and losses, and markings indicating whether the selection was my best player available (BPA), in the conversation, or definitively not one of the players I would have considered. Excluded altogether from this analysis are the six teams that didn’t have a first-round pick. They are: The Penguins, Canucks, Islanders, Coyotes, Lightning and Bruins.
  7. I agree we go for too many of that type. The Perrault pick was that upside pick you were looking for. I'm still kind of stunned we got that pick for a guy that gets hurt a lot. And I loved Kase before he got hurt. Colangelo looks like a really good pick also at 36. And maybe that's why they took Drysdale first. Cuz they knew two high potential players would be there.
  8. A full 103 days after it was supposed to take place, the first round of the 2020 NHL Draft is in the books. It looked different. The Bell Centre floor wasn’t crowded with team staff. Its lower bowl seats weren’t filled with media, prospects, and their families. Nobody walked across that stage. But 31 names were still called. As always at The Athletic, I’ve broken down all 31 of those selections, offering pick-by-pick analysis of the first round. After years of live and video viewings, conversations with sources, and reporting on these players, this marks the start of my two-day evaluation of every team’s performance at this year’s draft. This analysis does not evaluate any of the trades, nor the teams that didn’t pick. Instead, it will rank each of the teams that did pick based solely on their choices relative to my draft board, considering factors like organizational fit, the available players, and each prospect’s expected range. This is also not an evaluation of the total value the teams got out of their pick(s) but rather of the relative value they mined compared to where they picked. As such, teams with higher picks, or multiple first-round picks, aren’t guaranteed favourable grades. Here, the ranking will also be sorted into the following tiers: • Winners: Teams I believe won out over their competition with sleuth, home-run-level selections relative to where they picked. • Overtime winners: Teams I believe did well with where they were slotted, even if they might not have picked the exact player(s) I would have. • Overtime losers: Teams I believe could have done better but might, in time, be happy with their pick(s) regardless. • Losers: Teams I believe will regret taking the player(s) they took. For more insight into how I do my job and each of these players, check out my guide to scouting and my final top 100 ranking. Winners 1. Minnesota Wild Pick: 9. Marco Rossi My ranking: No. 3 (change: -6) If you’ve followed my draft coverage over the last couple of years, this ranking should come as no surprise to you. Rossi is ready to play in the NHL, he’s a centre, he’s the most well-rounded forward in the draft (maybe even including Lafreniere), he’s the best defensive forward in the draft, and he’s one of the most driven kids I’ve ever dealt with in seven years covering the draft. When he’s got the puck on his stick, he makes it nearly impossible for opposing defenders to take it off of him. When he doesn’t have the puck on his stick, he’s as gifted as any player in the draft at lifting it off the other guys and then making a play. And while I don’t think he’ll put up the counting stats offensively that players like Raymond and Perfetti do, his impact on the game could be higher on the whole. 2. Winnipeg Jets Pick: 10. Cole Perfetti My ranking: No. 4 (change: -6) I mean… this is what a home run looks like. It can’t really be overstated, either. Perfetti reads the play better than any prospect in the draft, he’s got point-per-game first-line upside, he’s closer to the NHL than I think just about anyone gives him credit for (ie. Maybe even this season!). I’m also jealous of Murat Ates, who now gets to cover the most articulate and well-spoken prospect I’ve ever interacted with. His only barrier is his strength. The rest (the processing power, the hands, the playmaking, the finishing) grades out at or near the top of his classmates across the board. Perfetti has future all-star and captain written all over him. He’s special and will, I’m confident, go down as one of the best value picks of the draft in five, 10, and 15 years time. 3. Florida Panthers Pick: 12. Anton Lundell My ranking: No. 9 (change: -3) Lundell always felt like he was the one top forward prospect in this draft who was most likely to fall a little. That’s because his game doesn’t have the same flair, or pop, or speed as the other top prospect in the draft. He doesn’t look dynamic at all times. But I think the idea that he’s more of a middle-six piece than a first-line one has always sold the entirety of his game short. Lundell is an excellent, often-surprising passer, he makes plays in all three zones, and his shot has become a real asset that his coaches rave about. But he’s also one of the better defensive players in the draft, one of the stronger puck-possession cycle players in the draft, and an assistant captain at the professional level as a teenager. 4. Los Angeles Kings Pick: 2. Quinton Byfield My ranking: No. 2 (change: none) The Kings got this right. And by all accounts, there was real consideration given to going another direction with their pick, so credit to them for taking the player who I’ve had all year locked in to No. 2 on my board. You can count on one hand the number forwards his size in the NHL who are top-three players on their teams. Evgeni Malkin. Mikko Rantanen. Eric Staal in his prime. Blake Wheeler. It’s a small list. And Byfield has the tools to join them. Once he added A-level skating to his frame (or close to it), he took a game that already blended power and finesse to the next level. I believe concerns over his projection and NHL readiness were overstated over the course of the last two years. When faceoffs, or defensive detail, or a hunched stride are your worries, you really don’t have a lot to worry about. He’ll sort those things out and the big skills are big. 5. Calgary Flames Pick: 24. Connor Zary My ranking: No. 13 (change: -11) Zary’s fabulous. He’s a wonderful, confident, engaging kid off the ice who knows who he is and what kind of player he wants to be. There’s a confidence to him on the ice that matches that, too. He fell because teams were worried about his pace and his ability to become a primary carrier at the next level, rather than a complementary offensive piece. I think the concerns about his skating have been overstated. He gets from A to B by always keeping his feet moving and hunting pucks. And with the puck, I love his ability to effectively drive a line without always needing to carry it. He can play the give and go game and dive into space. He can push pace in other ways, with a quick cut, or a leading pass. And he’s got a versatile shot that can release from a variety of spots on his body to score from around the slot. Zary at No. 24 is one of the better value picks of the first round for me and I love that they traded back and still got their guy. That’s a tidy bit of work. 6. Dallas Stars Pick: 30. Mavrik Bourque My ranking: No. 16 (change: -14) Bourque is one of those kids who was poised to fall, maybe by no fault of his own, due to outside circumstances. He plays in the QMJHL, a league I still maintain is underrepresented at the draft. He’s on the smaller side. He played his draft year on a Shawinigan team where his playmaking style wasn’t surrounded by suitable finishers. But the talent is undeniable. Bourque is the kind of player who can lead a line up the ice hanging onto the puck or deftly play the give-and-go game through quick, aggressive choices to the earliest available play. He’s also an impressive off-puck defender for his age, routinely fighting off checks from bigger players or lifting back possession with a smart stick. The Stars got mid-round talent with a late-round pick. That should always be the recipe. 7. Anaheim Ducks Pick: 6. Jamie Drysdale My ranking: No. 8 (change: +2) Pick: 27. Jacob Perreault My ranking: No. 25 (change: -2) The top-ranked defenceman on my board all year long, Drysdale was a defendable pick as soon as Lafreniere and Byfield were off the board. His edges and backwards skating are the best in the draft, with a stride that floats across the ice and looks effortless in all four directions. But there are layers to his game as well. His head is always up, he can picks teams apart with a pass when there isn’t room to skate into, he plays an extremely low-risk game considering his talent, and he can run a power play despite lacking a major shot threat. When he attacks, he’s rarely out of the play if a turnover does happen. I think Rossi and Perfetti are better prospects, and there’s a case for Alexander Holtz as a better fit (given the potential mixture with Trevor Zegras), but those all feel like nitpicking here. And the irony in the Ducks passing on the Holtz-Zegras fit at No. 6 is that they picked the next prospect most likely to excel with a player like Zegras in Perreault, one of the five best shooters in the draft and a player who can score from anywhere in the offensive zone, or create chances out of dead plays. Perrault’s going to have clean up his consistency and attention to detail away from the puck to get the most out of his talent, but his puck skill and finishing ability are already NHL quality. The rest should come. All told, the Ducks addressed two clear needs without reaching on either of them. That’s a good outcome for any team.
  9. He doesn't have it now. Maybe he grows into it? I don't know. Just spit balling as to why. The two way game is much more valued by the scouts and GMs than you are giving it 🙂. And the Ducks love it, that's for sure.
  10. Cant get rid of the above. Eric Stephens @icemancometh · 2m Now this is news. Ducks take a Russian player in draft. First one since Igor Bobkov in 2009. Artyon Galimov is already 21 but playing in KHL with Ak Bars Kazan. Left wing has three goals, four assists in 12 games so far this season.
  11. But how much do you really know about Moore? If you go to HockeyDB.com and compare the drafts of teams, the Ducks have historically done quite well. Even the later rounds with Manson, Kase, Belesky, Terry, Vantanen and other all taken Rounds 4-7. What makes you know for sure that these picks are good or bad? IT's fun to read up on these guys before the draft and like some more than others. I get that. But I read after Poirier was picked today that he's just horrid on the defensive end. So why was he listed at #33 on TV last night and then go #72? TB didn't know Point would be this good. If they did, he wouldn't have lasted so long. So much of these drafts is trying to project how well these guys will continue to grow into their bodies. So maybe they see something in Moore that they saw in Manson when he was picked. Just an educated guess based on his size.
  12. 27. Anaheim: Jacob Perreault, RW, Sarnia-OHL Eric Stephens: If the Ducks were to keep this pick and not use it in a deal to acquire more NHL-ready talent, I would see them taking a forward here if they grabbed Jamie Drysdale at No. 6. Having passed on a pure sniper like Alexander Holtz, I’d think they should consider a high-ceiling scorer like Perreault. The 18-year-old right wing has an elite-level shot, but he is not a one-trick pony. With teams in the OHL having to respect that shot, the Sarnia Sting star can also make plays to teammates. He also has the ability to work in close and score garbage goals, as well as pick corners on netminders. John-Jason Peterka and his dynamic skating and stronger overall game is tough to pass on. I can see Anaheim preferring him given its history of going for more well-rounded forwards. There are some skating and legitimate defense concerns with Perreault and he’ll need to work on both. But the Ducks once drafted a player who had a similar profile. His name is Corey Perry. With two first-round picks and the No. 36 selection, they can afford to take a big swing on someone that can put the puck in the net from anywhere.
  13. Sept 21, eric Stephens nails both picks https://theathletic.com/2072618/2020/09/21/nhl-staff-mock-draft-2020-changes-in-the-top-three-plus-an-audit-by-nhl-scouts/
×
×
  • Create New...